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Global Tailings Standard public consultation

The Global Tailings Review is a project led by the International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM), partnered with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI). The Global Tailings Review aims to stablish an international standard that improves the safe and secure management of mine tailings facilities.

The Standard compels stakeholders to implement best practices in the planning, design, construction, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of tailings facilities. The Global Tailings Review has considered the technical aspects of tailings storage facilities, and has recently launched a public consultation to enrich the draft.

The consultation aims to collect feedback from professionals, public authorities, local communities and investors. By reaching out to many experts and communities as possible, the Review intends to produce a robust and credible standard that will be taken up by the industry as broadly and quickly as possible.

The standard draft is available in our Resources page. To participate in the consultation, visit www.globaltailingsreview.org and complete the questionnaire. The consultations is available in many languages and it will be open until the 31 December 2019. The final standard will be published early in 2020.

This is an important step towards preventing catastrophic failures of tailings dam and improving the life of vulnerable communities. Once tailings facilities moved from concept to reality, they become a hazard that must be managed accordingly. The Global Tailings Review calls for innovation within the industry and the application of new technologies to minimise the risk of failure of tailings storage facilities.

At the II International Congress of Water Engineering and Geotechnics

The II International Congress of Water Engineering and Geotechnics (II CIAG 2019) was held in Trujillo – Peru on the 2nd, 3rd and 4th of October. The event was organized by the College of Engineers of Peru (CIP) and was attended by experts in hydraulic engineering, geotechnics and civil protection works from different Latin American countries .

Dr. Hans Sánchez of FUNAINHI participated as a speaker, presenting the advances provided by DAMSAT for the monitoring of water and tailings dams.

The Congress was a meeting point between researchers and technology developers for infrastructure projects. The occasion provided an excellent opportunity to share the experiences acquired during the development of DAMSAT.

At PERUMIN mining convention

On the 19th of September we were at the second largest Mining Convention in the world, PERUMIN 34. The event was organized by the Institute of Mining Engineers of Peru (IIMP).

Hans Sánchez of FUNAINHI presented DAMSAT in the forum of Technology, Innovation and Sustainability. During his presentation, he explained how satellite applications can help to monitor tailings dams and reduce the risk related to these structures.

The convention was a good opportunity to share experiences with other groups developing technologies for mining applications both in Peru and in other countries.

Water dam failure: space-based monitoring system gets the go-ahead for expansion

HR Wallingford will broaden our space-based dam monitoring system, DAMSAT, to include water dams in a bid to reduce the risk of failures. The UK Space Agency has extended our funding following a pilot project to monitor tailings dams used to store toxic mine waste in Peru. Ultimately the technology could be employed worldwide to reduce the risks to those living downstream of dams.

Goggle-Earth

Caption: The region of Cerro de Pasco, Peru will be monitored during HR Wallingford’s DAMSAT water dam trial.

Over the next two years, HR Wallingford will use the ground-breaking DAMSAT software to monitor movement at several water dams in the Cerro de Pasco region of Peru. The system uses Earth Observation (EO) techniques – including the analysis of spectral responses and iron traces from satellite images as well as data from navigation systems – combined with real-time in-situ devices

The consequences of water dam failures can be catastrophic. Earlier this year a breach at Tiware dam in India flooded seven villages and swept away 20 people, according to local media reports. DAMSAT could help to prevent such devastation by alerting authorities of problems with structures before they are at risk of failing.

Marta Roca Collell, project manager at HR Wallingford, said: ‘DAMSAT allows authorities to monitor dams remotely, particularly useful in isolated locations or where there are concerns about dam management’.

DAMSAT’s potential in the water sector is huge.  Globally, nearly 60,000 dams are registered with the International Commission for large Dams (ICOLD), which are estimated to hold 16, 201 km3 of water – the same volume as around 6.5 billion Olympic-sized swimming pools.

HR Wallingford leads the research consortium alongside international partners. The group is sponsored by the UK Space Agency’s International Partnership Programme (IPP), a five-year, £152 million programme designed to partner UK space expertise with overseas governments and organizations to deliver sustainable, economic or societal benefits.

The potential to reduce the risks posed by tailings dams using satellite-based information

Our latest article “The potential to reduce the risks posed by tailings dams using satellite-based information” published in the International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction is available as a free download until 20 August 2019 directly from the Publishers’ website Elsevier.

To download the paper, visit https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1ZJpE7t2zY-Hfk

Bibliographic details
Darren Lumbroso, Caitlin McElroy, Craig Goff, Marta Roca Collell, Gregor Petkovsek, Mark Wetton, The potential to reduce the risks posed by tailings dams using satellite-based information, International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, Volume 38, 2019, 101209, ISSN 2212-4209, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijdrr.2019.101209. (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212420919302766)